dr_suess
  • From: Massachusetts, USA
  • Style: Surrealism, Animation, Art Deco, Illustration
  • Media: Illustrations, Serigraph on Canvas, Lithograph, Resin, Bronze
  • Subject: Imaginary Worlds, Animals, Figures, Unorthodox Taxidermy
  • Art Value:
    Limited Editions: $250 and up
    Sculptures: $2,295 and up

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Dr. Seuss Gallery - Sold Out - Cat in the Hat Print

Rare / Sold Out Editions

All Dr. Seuss art, like this Cat in the Hat print, are reproduced in small limited editions, with each piece signed and individually numbered. Sold-out editions are works that are no longer available from the publisher and because of their scarcity have shown a substantial increase in value. Marcus Ashley Gallery, the premier Dr. Seuss art gallery, is proud to offer a large inventory of sold-out and rare editions for purchase – buy Dr. Seuss Art by clicking the button above.

Dr. Seuss Gallery - Taxidermy Collection

Taxidermy Collection

Dr. Seuss embarked on an ingenious project in the early 1930s as he evolved from two-dimensional artworks to three-dimensional sculptures. What was most unusual for these mixed-media sculptures was the use of real animal parts including beaks, antlers and horns from deceased Forest Park Zoo animals where Dr. Seuss’s father was superintendent. The Unorthodox Collection of Taxidermy was born in a cramped New York apartment and included a menagerie of inventive creatures with names like the “Two Horned Drouberhannis,” “Andulovian Grackler,” and “Semi-Normal Green-Lidded Fawn.” Shortly after Dr. Seuss created this unique collection of artworks, Look Magazine dubbed Seuss “The World’s Most Eminent Authority on Unheard-Of Animals.” To this day, Dr. Seuss’s Unorthodox Collection of Taxidermy remains as some of the finest examples of his inventive and multi-dimensional creativity.

Marcus Ashley Gallery, the premier Dr. Seuss gallery, has the only complete Taxidermy Collection on display. Here you will see all of the sold out and rare taxidermies and other Dr. Seuss art for sale.

Dr. Seuss Art for Sale - Archive Works

Secret Art & Archive Works

Dr. Seuss secret art works in this collection are typically not known to the readers of Dr. Seuss’ children’s books, like Cat in the Hat; but they encompass more than 60 years of Dr. Seuss illustrations, drawings and Dr. Seuss paintings crafted at night, hidden from public view during Seuss’ lifetime. Expect to find here wild and disorderly work, political cartoons, ad campaigns, works of wit and brilliance and other non-classifiable Dr. Seuss original art work that redefine this American icon.

Cat in the Hat Print - Dr. Seuss Art for Sale

Illustrations Art

Dr. Seuss personally created every rough sketch, preliminary drawing, final line drawing and finished work for each page of every book he wrote. Despite the technical and budgetary limitations of color printing during the early and mid-twentieth century, Dr. Seuss the artist was meticulous about color selection. In order to maintain the visual attention of a six-year-old mind, saturated reds and blues were carefully chosen for The Cat in the Hat print, as seen here. He created specially numbered color charts and elaborate color call-outs to precisely accomplish his vision for each book.

Dr. Seuss Art for Sale - Bronze Sculptures of The Lorax and The Cat in the Hat

Bronze Collection

The Bronze Collection was sculpted as a tribute to Dr. Seuss’ most iconic characters like The Lorax and The Cat in the Hat. Artist Leo Rijn, the inaugural sculptor was selected to launch this project due to his prized work with some of today’s top talent in the world of film, entertainment and the visual arts (including Tim Burton, Ang Lee and Steven Spielberg). Leo has truly captured the essence of Dr. Seuss’ whimsical creations. With impeccable attention to detail and small edition sizes these eight exclusive characters are very much in demand and quite collectable. Find Dr. Seuss prints and paintings at the premier Dr. Seuss Art Gallery, Marcus Ashley Gallery.

A doodler at heart, Dr. Seuss often remarked—with a twinkle in his eye—that he never really learned to draw. His school notebooks often included bizarre creatures that framed sporadic notes he had taken in class.

For over 60 years, Dr. Seuss’s original art and illustrations brought a visual realization to his fantastic and imaginary worlds. However, his artistic talent went far beyond the printed page, as in Dr. Seuss Secret Art works – the paintings and sculptures he did at night for himself that he rarely exhibited during his lifetime. Dr. Seuss always dreamed of sharing these works with his fans and had entrusted his wife, Audrey, to carry out his wishes once he was gone. Audrey, too, believed the work deserved further recognition and that Dr. Seuss himself would one day be evaluated not only as an author, but also as an artist in his own right.

In 1997, this dream was realized when The Art of Dr. Seuss project was launched. For the first time in history, collectors were able to see and acquire lithographs, serigraphs and sculptures reproduced from Dr. Seuss’s original art drawings and Dr. Seuss paintings. In her introduction to the collection Audrey Geisel wrote, “I remember telling Ted that there would come a day when many of his paintings would be seen and he would thus share with his fans another facet of himself – his private self. That day has come. I am glad.”

This historic project has opened the world’s eyes to the unique artistic talent of Dr. Seuss and, as such, Dr. Seuss art galleries, museums and collectors have helped make Audrey Geisel’s promise, and Dr. Seuss’s dream, a reality.

Just 15 years after Dr. Seuss passed away, these artworks toured leading Dr. Seuss art galleries and museums across the world, establishing Seuss as a significant artist of the 20th century. Today limited edition Dr. Seuss prints, Dr. Seuss sculptures and various Dr. Seuss art for sale can now be found at galleries along side the works of Rembrandt, Picasso and Miro. This Dr. Seuss art gallery is one of the select few with a variety of Dr. Seuss art inventory.

When Ted needed to clear his thoughts or relieve creative block, he often took an afternoon walk through his garden. Ted considered gardening and tending to his trees other art forms altogether, and his work in this “media” created a soft, pastoral setting.

According to Ted, however, his greatest work wasn’t a particular book or lavish gardens. Ted considered his greatest contribution to be the Lion Wading Pool at Wild Animal Park in San Diego, which he donated around 1973 (Dr. Seuss from Then to Now, p. 80).